FBBVA-14-TIC-Kleinrock

Leonard Kleinrock

FRONTIERS OF KNOWLEDGE LAUREATE

Information and Communication Technologies

7th edition

The BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in the Information and Communication Technologies category has been granted in this seventh edition to American engineer Leonard Kleinrock for his seminal contributions to the theory and practical development of the Internet, in particular to the development of packet switching transmission.

CITATION (EXCERPT)

The BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in the Information and Communication Technologies category is granted to Leonard Kleinrock, Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), for his seminal contributions to the theory and practical development of the Internet. Kleinrock was responsible for establishing the first remote connection between two computers in 1969, and he developed queuing theory, the crucial mathematical foundation for packet switching networks, one of the basic technologies behind the Internet.

The first connection between two remote computers was made on October 29, 1969, within the framework of the Arpanet project, with one computer located at his lab at UCLA and the other at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI). The significance of this contribution is that this connection is considered a precursor of Internet.

The development of queuing theory, which allowed the disruptive transition from circuit switching (as used in analog telephone networks) to packet switching, has great significance not only for the Internet but also for many other fields such as traffic control, logistics, manufacturing and transportation. In all these applications, queuing theory leads to significant reduction of waiting times.